With the increasing cross-over and blurring across markets, B2B marketing is under pressure to better engage with and connect with customers at the right time in their purchase cycle, with the right information. In his article for DemandGen Report, Erik Matlick addresses three developing trends that have the power to shape B2B marketing in 2019 and beyond.

Thanks to advancements in Big Data, AI, and programmatic, the gap between B2C and B2B marketing is narrowing. B2B marketers have a lifted ability to identify and engage with business prospects online. New platforms, strategies, and regulations have the potential to make big waves in 2019, bringing with them new opportunities for the organizations that are prepared:

Growth for B2B marketing ecosystem beyond walled gardens

The consumer marketing industry has two of the largest ‘competitors’ that ultimately cannot be beaten: Google and Facebook. These platforms represent a major part of B2C operations. While there is no doubt that B2B brings in revenue for Google and Facebook, neither has formally released a specific B2B marketing product. Thus allowing for the continued growth of the B2B marketing ecosystem.

Account Based Marketing (ABM) isn’t just about marketing…

While there is plenty of buzz around ABM, it’s not new. For decades, business have been organized around target markets and customer segments. But with vast differences between product, customer buying journey, pipeline velocity and marketing stack sophistication, there is still no universal application of ABM.  However, the best ABM strategies and level of sophistication tends to depend on the resources available, and hinges on sales and marketing alignment.

Say hello to high quality B2B data

GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act are placing a burden on data purveyors who cannot meet these requirements. The marketplace will be ‘weeded’ with high-quality data sellers, adhering to these rules and regulations remaining. Good news for sales and marketers alike, who will gain much more value in the long term.


This article was first published on The Drum